Down Low and Up Close

It’s been snowing here today. The wind is bitterly cold, but the ground temperature is still a bit too warm for the snow to lie for any length of time. When I went outside to take photos only minutes after the latest snowfall, the melt had already begun, and what was left were water droplets. One of the most enjoyable results, I’ve found, from taking photos every day is that I’ve learned that by squatting down low and getting up close, even the ordinary everyday can become beautiful, intricate, fascinating. Here’s 3 photos I took just before lunch of water droplets on a web under a rosebush, and condensation on my bedroom window.

Droplets on Web

Condensation 2

Condensation

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January 3, 2008. Environment, Photography.

8 Comments

  1. Damien replied:

    Incredible resolution. I’m assuming you used a “macro” setting?

  2. Kelly Jene replied:

    Thats fantastic! It looks like purposeful art, even though it is “simply” water droplets.

  3. Mike replied:

    I love coming to your blog and seeing new photos. They are always so beautiful.

  4. amypalko replied:

    Yes, Damien, I did indeed. I love that macro setting!

    It does rather, doesn’t it, Kelly Jene! If you look closely in the 3rd photo you can see the two houses opposite mine reflected upside down in the droplet. I could stare at water droplets for hours…

    Oh, thank you, Mike! You have no idea how encouraging your positive feedback is :-)

  5. nicholas replied:

    Those are beautiful!

  6. Sparky Parenting « Lives Less Ordinary replied:

    […] and let them help you to rediscover your curiosity in life the universe and everything.  Squat down low, get up close, ask questions, find out answers, but above all, awaken […]

  7. amypalko replied:

    Thank you, Nicholas :-) Glad you liked them!

  8. The One Place You Must See Before You Die « Lives Less Ordinary replied:

    […] now time to zero in on the details.  Pick up your camera and, turning on your macro setting, get up close to your subjects and start capturing the intimate curves of the petals, the gradation of colour in […]

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